50 thoughts on “True Beauty For A Friday Morning

    • I celebrate his eloquence and I also consider all those who have suffered and didn’t have the internal fortitude to believe in their own song. I can remember almost every name I was called, every effort to ‘rise above’, and yet to this day, when I return to those moments in time, I still cry for that little kid. xox

      • I know. The whole time I was watching I was thinking, “this man made a *conscious* decision to rise above, and that was not easy”. I can gratefully say that I wasn’t bullied much as a child, but I have always cringed at the cruelty that children can display against one another. So sorry that you had to endure a single moment of nastiness–no one I know deserves it less…. Xoxox, l

      • Some things are hard to forget and harder to rationalize…and some things you just put away because the constant scrutiny leaves you paralyzed. I did ok – I have been gifted with an awful lot of love…present company included..xox

    • Thank you Elizabeth..at the end of the day, I was a geeky young girl, and a not-particularly-appealing early teen. My saving grace at that point was that I already bore the nickname ‘mom’ – so for some I was safe haven. For others, I was just fodder for some pretty ugly behavior..xo

      • Ouch, that would hurt.
        I was painfully shy, so that sent me a bit of taunting.
        However, I did learn to hide from it, and i had a mother and father who had a positive belief in me, and were always proud of me, so I had that going for me.
        I do not know how these kids survive where the taunting comes from both within the home and in the schools as well.How can they ever learn to rise above it and make something of themselves?

      • Clearly some have tremendous fortitude and frighteningly others never do rise above it. Hopefully there are mentors and friends found along the way, support offered from unlikely sources perhaps – but offered nonetheless..

      • Mimijk, this video – but your words above particularly “for some pretty ugly behaviour”, it is so deeply distressing to me. I truly rejoice you claiming your life.

        Sincere best to you, ever on.

      • I’ve been blessed…and I’ve been scarred. I didn’t mean to distress you, and I’m both sorry for that and grateful for your abundantly caring heart. Many hugs, m

  1. I am convinced that everyone of us has been bullied–this was powerful — read an article in the paper today that bullies suffer from the guilt of having done things they knew were wrong, but did them to be accepted – I think once we realize that the bully and the bullied are not that far apart we can come to some understanding-I believe there is a small percentage of evil in the world and there are bullies who do not feel human pain; but I think the majority of people are dealing with something–and it comes out in all sorts of ways
    Thanks for making us all aware

    • I agree with you – I’m not convinced that bullying comes from a ‘bad’ place (though it has terrible results) – rather, ignorance, insecurity, a need to feel in control, etc…The hard part is assuming that the bullied have to take the high road – and that’s a hard concept to wrap one’s head around..

      • I don’t disagree with that either..yet, in a recent documentary on bullying, in my own history, the request was made of the child who was being treated horribly, to understand and let it go. I think there is an increasingly raised collective consciousness about bullying, and I also think there are too many times when a child suffers silently or doesn’t receive the support we would want for them

      • there is a new commercial on tv where a child is bullied and he goes to the parent and the voice over says that doing that helps end the bullying and in many cases–just telling someone does help it go away–but you have to tell someone, and tell the right someone

      • I’m sure that’s true – telling the right someone..And continuing the efforts that are being made to underscore the impact of bullying..

  2. Should be required viewing for parents and their children before they enter middle school. And, then they should revisit it before the high school years. I don’t think Shane missed a point and with every point he made I was transported back to a different school yard complete with horrific memory. Our teachers failed miserable at intervening when they should have and our parents advice to “learn to take care of it yourself” missed the mark. It scares me that with all the anti-bullying programs in place today, this abhorrent behavior continues. However; it is comforting to watch this performance and know the inner strength this man must possess to have risen above the names he was called and the ‘boxes’ he was placed in as a child. So, on this Friday, there is hope. And, it should be one of the many parenting and educator jobs we assume to free all children from the name calling and limitations we and their peers, knowingly and also inadvertently, place upon them. Have the best weekend, may it be filled with the promise of a better tomorrow for our youngest citizens and hope for a more secure and confident future for us all as we put those demons from our childhood to rest at last. To the moon and back…All there is.

    • You’re so on point honey – as always..It is my ardent wish that these efforts and awareness campaigns have a positive impact. No child should be so wounded..to the moon and back..xo

  3. I know of your childhood pain because we’ve shared memories and many conversations, but I need to say I have always thought you to be mesmerizing, gifted, talented, beautiful, wise beyond your years and kind; so very kind. Sometimes I wish we had a built-in rear view mirror so we could focus on seeing ourselves the way those who know and love us best do; without the perceptions others and sometimes we have of ourselves. In the end we all did okay, but sadly some scars never heal. Love you my friend. All there is for almost – scared ya huh, no way was I going to write a never here. Suffice it to say a long time. ❤

  4. Thank you, Mimi. I was often bullied, and can relate too well to what he was saying. In school I would sometimes defend others who were being bullied, but I rarely stood up for myself. That made me feel proud and ashamed at the same time.

    Russ

  5. Reblogged this on Lead.Learn.Live. and commented:
    You’ll say that you don’t have 12 minutes to watch this. Then you’ll say WOW – I’m glad I did. Shane Koyczan was born in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories. He grew up in Penticton, British Columbia. In 2000, he became the first Canadian to win the Individual Championship title at the National Poetry Slam. I was MOVED by this man and his words. Thank you Mimi for sharing.

  6. This one really got to me. What a magnificent man/voice. I wish every parent and child, every human being would watch this. Today of all days, I am especially grateful I took the time and did. Thank you so much, mimi
    (I hope that’s your name). I’m so move by him, this, and that you posted it. Many warm cyber hugs to you. Have a good weekend. Paulette

    • Hi Paulette – For many reasons this video affected me deeply as well. I’m glad the timing was so fortuitous for you to see it. And yes – every parent and child, every human being would be will served by watching this video. Thank you so much for the cyber hugs too! Mimi

  7. Mimi, I have watched this several times since your posting and have shared it with some parents whose children have been on the wrong end of bullying. the response has been overwhelming. Thanks again. Bill

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